Monday, May 22, 2006

Mourning Dove


No special reason for posting this picture of a Mourning Dove, except that it was just "there" and looking good. Oh, and the fact that it's the first bird digiscoped through my new Pentax PF-80ED spotting scope which just came today. I think I'm going to like it.

6 Comments:

At 7:38 PM, Blogger Juliabohemian said...

I want one. My sister took a picture of a Eurasian Collared Dove that she saw living as a pet inside a store in Minneapolis. She didn't know that was what it was, though. She sent me the picture. It must have been a pet because they only live in the Southernmost part of the East coast.

 
At 11:40 PM, Anonymous The Flycatcher said...

Just within the past month there has been a flurry of sightings of Eurasian Collared Doves here in Oregon. It seems unlikely that they are getting here on their own all the way from Florida where they first appeared in the U.S. My guess is that they are escaped pets, but maybe not. They are reportedly expanding their range naturally in the southeast.

 
At 10:49 AM, Anonymous Sarah Porter said...

dear floyd that mourning dove was so pretty . do you remember a while ago I gave mary some pot-holders .. well I'm making a crossed stitched cardenal for you. it says cardenal at the top and floyd at the bottom.

 
At 11:11 PM, Blogger Juliabohemian said...

I wonder if people were using them like homing pigeons and they perhaps got away. I read that they are the friendliest of all dove species.

 
At 3:16 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I recently moved to Oregon. Up to now, each day of my life has been brightened by the call of the Mourning Dove. Are there any of these doves near Portland, Oregon?

 
At 5:39 PM, Anonymous The Flycatcher said...

Welcome to Oregon! You will be happy to find that the Mourning Dove is a quite common bird in our state, although perhaps not the most conspicuous. You will find it near parks and other open areas in cities and towns, and even more commonly in agricultural areas throughout the state except along the northern coastal strip. Now you should also be watching for the Eurasian Collared-Dove that seems to be rapidly moving into Oregon. There have been more reports this spring than in all the previous years combined since it was first reported from Harney Co. in 1999.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home